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The Open Collaboration Data Factory (OCDF) data census is a community effort that seeking to aggregate public datasets related to social media and online communities. Using an emergent metadata standard the data census is an ongoing project whose goal is to identify and catalog free data sources. The most recent manifestation of the OCDF data census contains over 110 datasets identified and cataloged by students enrolled in data management, digital curation and metadata courses at three separate iSchools. Soon the census will allow members of the public to utilize, merge, and manipulate resources to promote scholarship.

Note: Currently, data census records reflect the use of the initial data entry form. Now we ask contributors to use Version 2.0.

About the Data Census

Contributors

The data census is supported by contributors at several universities. Information about past classes, which have contributed are available although incomplete.

Census Workflow

Presently, a workflow is in-development for OCDF data census contributors. Although this workflow is not a standard, those contributing should consider reviewing it.

About the Virtual Institute

Open online communities (OOC) have emerged as significant drivers of innovation, economic activity, and social well being. OOCs play important roles in a wide variety of areas, including but not limited to software development, general knowledge management, education, health, and scientific discovery. Scholars and practitioners from different disciplines (e.g. computer science) engage in OOC research to build understanding that in turn helps citizens successfully manage and grow OOCs. For example, management scholars in free and open source software (FOSS) focus on developing theories of collaboration on these projects drawn from rich, qualitative methods, while software engineering scholars address developer coordination tools and specific issues of how to make sense of electronic trace data through software repository mining. Human computer interaction (HCI) scholars in free and open source software (FOSS) are particularly focused designing tools to support different modes of collaboration. The research contexts are identical, but differences in data and methodologies prevent the development of coherent understandings forming across disciplines. Similar challenges exist in studies of Wikipedia, online health support communities, citizen science projects, open online courses among other groups. Building a community of scholars who address differences in research aims, data and methods will enable a new, interdisciplinary synthesis of OOC knowledge. In turn, this will increase the coherence of scientific and public communication across existing disciplines that study OOCs.

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Figure 1: Research Challenges and SAVI Theory of Change

There is a diffuse discourse across a range of disciplines about knowledge creation in OOCs. The left side of this figure illustrates the foundational issue at the base, and then points to two gaps in research and research methods, noting Wikipedia and GitHub as two possible targets. These are examples, and the SAVI seeks to explore broader issues and other sites. The right side of this figure outlines our strategy for building an interdisciplinary, international institute with a diverse community of scholars. We propose to draw members from various scholarly homes through working groups, workshops and hackathons. A central aspect of this project is developing spaces and opportunities for collaboration that will support wider and more productive conversations about OOC research. There is a diffuse discourse across a range of disciplines about knowledge creation in OOCs. The left side of this figure illustrates the foundational issue at the base, and then points to two gaps in research and research methods, noting Wikipedia and GitHub as two possible targets. These are examples, and the SAVI seeks to explore broader issues and other sites. The right side of this figure outlines our strategy for building an interdisciplinary, international institute with a diverse community of scholars. We propose to draw members from various scholarly homes through working groups, workshops and hackathons. A central aspect of this project is developing spaces and opportunities for collaboration that will support wider and more productive conversations about OOC research.

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